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  1. The Makers of Rome: Nine Lives | The Nile | TheMarket NZ
  2. Other Titles by Plutarch
  3. Similar Books
  4. Makers Rome Nine Lives

He excelled at single combat, killing every opponent that challenged him. He was awarded the spolia opima, and pursued Hannibal until his death. He trained himself to follow a sober mode of living, and possessed a tough constitution and a strong body. He served in his first campaign at the age of seventeen, and was a formidable fighter.

On active duty he drank water, and when he was thirsty he would ask for vinegar, or when his strength was exhausted add a little wine. He was attracted to the ideals of simplicity and self-discipline. Sep 02, B. Plutarch writes biographies the way they are meant to be read.


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  6. The Makers Of Rome: Nine Lives.

In The Makers of Rome, nine key leaders are chosen who cover the time of transition from Rome's Republic to its Empire. Beginning with Coriolanus and ending with Antony actually with the death of Cleopatra who Plutarch hated he works from one great individual after another through time. These are not biographies in the way we think today for two major reasons. You have to pay attention to catch his tongue in cheek "some have said" type factoids. I suppose I could throw in as a third point how he tried to shape the historical outline of his subjects to force a greater parallel between his Greek and Roman leaders, but since this book only picks out nine Romans, that parallel doesn't really come into play here.

In spite of this, Plutarch is an easy and excellent read for those with an interest in Roman history. Whether this is an introduction to the topic or if you already have extensive knowledge of this period of time, this is a worthwhile read. Aug 15, Locky rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-in Plutarch brings to life nine detailed biographies of Rome's greatest men within the era of the republic in 'Makers of Rome'.

The Makers of Rome: Nine Lives | The Nile | TheMarket NZ

These biographies are extremely entertaining to read, as I've found to always be the case regarding the writings of Plutarch, with a sprinkling of humorous hyperbolic which is typical of historians of old a classic example of this being the inventions of Archimedes, which could apparently lift a fully sized hostile Roman ship clean out of the water and whirl it around, cas Plutarch brings to life nine detailed biographies of Rome's greatest men within the era of the republic in 'Makers of Rome'. These biographies are extremely entertaining to read, as I've found to always be the case regarding the writings of Plutarch, with a sprinkling of humorous hyperbolic which is typical of historians of old a classic example of this being the inventions of Archimedes, which could apparently lift a fully sized hostile Roman ship clean out of the water and whirl it around, casting the crew in all manner of directions.

These Romans are crazy. Despite knowing very little about the Roman republic before reading this book I found it very easy to understand roughly the various positions and terms, and it's all very easy to read and both interesting and entertaining. It's pretty clear that Plutarch didn't let facts get in the way of a good story especially in the case of Mark Antony but there are plenty of footnotes throughout the book and an appendix specifically related to the historical facts of the life of Mar These Romans are crazy.

It's pretty clear that Plutarch didn't let facts get in the way of a good story especially in the case of Mark Antony but there are plenty of footnotes throughout the book and an appendix specifically related to the historical facts of the life of Mark Antony. It's left me keen to read more of Plutarch's Lives. One warning though, the Kindle edition of this book is just appallingly edited. It's full of OCR and formatting errors and doesn't appear to have been so much as proofread, so I'd recommend a print version.

Also, I don't know why it's called "Makers of Rome", the title doesn't fit at all. Jul 16, Jesse rated it it was amazing. When all the wealth of the Antigonid dynasty fell into Roman hands during the mid 2nd century, there was a lot of corruption. The Gracchi brothers meant to set that straight - introducing a land bill that would make Ted Turner cringe, Tiberius Gracchus represented what the republic could've been.

Along with his brother, Gaius, these two champions of the people were brutally murdered, setting the stage for the incredibly dramatic and disgusting power politics of the first century. Instead of a pe When all the wealth of the Antigonid dynasty fell into Roman hands during the mid 2nd century, there was a lot of corruption. Instead of a people's republic, the tribunate was torn asunder from the real decision-making process as the military element took complete control of the state, and Ceasarism was born. Oct 08, Masen Production rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , history.

Once again he has taken us into the souls of the Romans who were resolute in their beliefs and stood up what they perceived was needed of them. Finally losing the perspective that started them on the course. These men shaped the future of Rome and the way it went from a democracy towards one man rule.

I strongly recommend this book. Nov 25, Sean Chick rated it really liked it. A wonderful collection of biographies. I am impressed by Plutarch's ability to describe the best and worst of each man, in particular in regards to Cato and Fabius. His dislike for Antony comes through though, and that biography strikes me as too long.

Yet even there he admits that Antony had some talents and high points. It is nice to see a man who does not veer between hagiography and a hatchet job, both of which are too common nowadays as in the last years. Jan 11, Jenn Phizacklea rated it liked it Shelves: ancient-rome. There is such limited information in the footnotes, beyond the occasional note of what year events occur by no means consistently noted, which I find frustrating and sometimes back references to when a person has appeared previously.

The introduction is hardly worth reading, and the appendices were written in a way that I would hardly call accessible - and why is the first annex about Shakespeare? And why the deuce is there no index? This is a serious failing, unfortunately consistent to all of the Penguin Plutarch books. Not at all helpful for someone studying the period and why else does one read Plutarch? Are people reading it for fun? I was lost as it was, and that had decent end notes. Then I took on Livy Oh well. So I only read the final five lives in this collection.

Mar 06, Henry Ferguson rated it it was amazing. As someone who is devoted more time towards reading and self improvement; this is a superb tome which has increased my understanding of the Republican Era of Rome. Even though this is a historical book. Firm self-discipline can make a great many things possible such as Brutus reducing his sleep to a minimum period without affecting his cognitive functions from his actions this appears to be true, in my humble opinion As someone who is devoted more time towards reading and self improvement; this is a superb tome which has increased my understanding of the Republican Era of Rome.

Firm self-discipline can make a great many things possible such as Brutus reducing his sleep to a minimum period without affecting his cognitive functions from his actions this appears to be true, in my humble opinion , thus leaving time for more productive pursuits. Furthermore, this tome, though dramatised and lacking correct data at some points, kept me interested throughout. A great read for an up and coming reader whom is interested in the study of History. Sep 14, Michael rated it really liked it. Compelling reading.

One reviewer remarked on the difficulty of the writing. My translation by Scott-Kilvert was easy to read and follow. The Romans valued military prowess and politics and both were in continuous flux. Not many leaders died of old age but were killed in war, died by their own hand, or were the victim of political assassination. Read the section on Mark Antony and based on your response, continue or not with the other biographies. This entire book is well worth reading. Mar 10, Fabian Il. Simply great.

Jun 05, Victoria added it Shelves: biography , education , textbook , nonfiction , history , classics , college.

Zoe Romano a World Wide Rome - The MAKERS editiond

Ooh, my man sure does love storytelling, and I'm about it. The Cato the Elder chapter is my favorite.

Other Titles by Plutarch

Nov 27, Justin rated it really liked it. Not being familiar with the works of Plutarch, I made the mistake of buying this abridged version rather than the complete Parallel Lives. This was the only problem I had with the book and I'm not sure I'm being fair by giving it just four stars. The extant 23 lives must make a large book and I suppose it wouldn't sell as well as a limited selection. In such cases I either have to interrupt the flow of the reading just to see what I'm missing, or try to go back to the footnotes later, after I've lost a lot of their context.

I honestly don't know what publishers are thinking. The writing of Plutarch is slightly more interesting than Suetonious and far less monotonous than Livy, though I wouldn't credit his accounts with too much accuracy. Compared with these authors and others like Tacitus, Polybius, and Gibbon, Plutarch almost seems like an ideal introduction to Roman history, with just a few caveats. Firstly, before reading the Lives you should at least be aware of the general timeline of republican Rome, and have some knowledge of the events taking places.

The wars of Hannibal, the proscriptions of Sulla, the political campaigns of the Gracchi and the Civil Wars are all casually alluded to by Plutarch as common knowledge at the time.

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You'll also want to know something about the political system of Rome and the different offices involved as well as the structure and geography of the Roman world. On review it occurs to me that the editor of this book did not include a lot of context for the Lives, and that a stranger to the era could easily have been lost - although a quick overview on wikipedia should be enough to start off.

Another setback for beginners though a very minor one is that the narratives of this particular volume seem to stand slightly stage left of the central actors. Which is not to say that any of them are minor characters, but that each seems to play the secondary role of his era.


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  • For someone who's already acquainted with the principle actors, this makes the selection even more interesting, not less, but someone new to Roman History might wonder why they aren't reading about the victors, rather than the defeated. Naturally of course such a distinction can only be made in hindsight - at the time there would have been no way of knowing that Sertorius was not the first man of his age, or that Antony was not destined to be the first Roman Emperor. That in itself, I suppose, is one of the best reasons to read the book. I am struck again and again how lively the writing of the ancients still seems today.

    This is another one of those occasions. The Romans are a fascinating bunch anyway, if not always easy to love, but this collection of nine of the Lives truly animates them and makes them seem to occupy the room with one.

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    Two of the Lives covered here have awoken in the English-speaking consciousness through their treatment by Shakespeare - not to mention by Richard Burton and Liz Taylor. Through "Julius Caesar" I am struck again and again how lively the writing of the ancients still seems today. Shakespeare alone can apparently not carry the sole responsibility for their dramatisation.

    Plutarch himself was more interested in painting a lively portrait than in strict academic method, and of course these lives were outright dramatic. The translator includes some notes on the Life of Mark Anthony which draw on other sources and show where Plutarch has bent the facts a little to make the account fizz, but these almost serve to highten the drama.

    In particular, I learned from the notes of the religious symbolism of the Asp which may have taken Cleopatra's life and at the same time pointed to her deification. The Romans were intriguing characters, alternatively iron-hard military men, principled Republicans prepared to die rather than fall under the sway of a new King, ruthless opportunists prepared to kill or spare life based on calculated expediency and gluttonous hedonists devoted to their pleasures. Mark Anthony, in particular, seems to have been at once a talented military leader, greedy for power, while having an appealing weakness for women.

    And wine. And song. Brutus is a revelation in the nearness to which this familiarly political idealist came to military victory over the triumvirate of Anthony, Octavius and Lepidus. Then there is the stern asceticism of the censorious Cato, the sacrifice and ideals of the Gracchi, the patient methodology of Marcellus in grinding down Hannibal and the martial ferocity of Coriolanus.

    All of them come to life in Plutarch's hands.

    I will most definitely be reading more Plutarch when I get the chance. Jul 24, Julian Meynell rated it really liked it Shelves: greek , history , ancient , roman. This is a selection from Plutarch's parallel lives focusing on notable Romans of the Republic. Interestingly, three of the lives covered here were the direct inspiration for Shakespeare - Coriolanus, Brutus and Marc Anthony. Plutarch knows how to spin a yarn and furthermore how to make a character come vividly to life.

    In effect his writing provides short but memorable sketches which focus on character. Plutarch is also not an intellectual slouch and will occasionally spit out fascinating observ This is a selection from Plutarch's parallel lives focusing on notable Romans of the Republic.

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    Makers Rome Nine Lives

    Plutarch is also not an intellectual slouch and will occasionally spit out fascinating observations. However, it is clear that his talents are in the short essay because he is not really interested in proposing complex theses. I'm not sure if reading a selection of Plutarch's Parallel Lives is the best way to come at Plutarch. In particular, it removed the central conceit of two lives being contrasted completely as these were always paired Greek and Roman lives. But I am currently learning more about the Roman Republic, a period of time which I had known far less well than the Empire and this is why I read this selection.

    Whether or not this selection is the place to start with Plutarch, he is well worth reading and can be consumed in bite size pieces. You will find here all that can be expected of Plutarch: colourful characters, anecdotes and occasional digressions. To those beginning their journey with this great ancient biographer, keep in mind that the sources the author relied on had not always been the most reliable. He also had a propensity for extolling his protagonists. While vigorously praising their strengths he frequently misportrayed their blatant malefaction as mere expedience.

    Still, Plutarch remains a great read and a perfect supplement to any history study, breathing life into otherwise meaningless names and dates. Penguin edition, which I used and recommend, has useful footnotes to help readers keep track of time and alert them of any glaring historical discrepancies. He died in Table of Contents Makers of RomeIntroduction 1. Coriolanus 2. Fabius Maximus 3.

    Macellus 4. Cato the Elder 5. Tiberius Gracchus 6. Gaius Gracchus 7. Sertorius 8. Brutus 9. Mark Antony Appendix Maps. See All Customer Reviews. Shop Books. Add to Wishlist. USD Sign in to Purchase Instantly. Overview Nine biographies that illuminate the careers, personalities and military campaigns of some of Rome's greatest statesmen The lives of the statesmen featured in this collection span the earliest days of the Republic to the establishment of the Empire.

    About the Author Plutarch 's life spanned the second half of the 1st century AD. Average Review. Write a Review. Related Searches. The Angel Maker. A literary page-turner about one man's macabre ambition to create life-and secure immortality The village A literary page-turner about one man's macabre ambition to create life-and secure immortality The village of Wolfheim is a quiet little place until the geneticist Dr. Victor Hoppe returns after an absence of nearly twenty years.

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